Public Records FAQ

Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA)

From Utah Code Section 63G-2-102:

“. . . the Legislature recognizes two constitutional rights: (a) the public's right of access to information concerning the conduct of the public's business; and (b) the right of privacy in relation to personal data gathered by governmental entities.

The Legislature also recognizes a public policy interest in allowing a government to restrict access to certain records, as specified in this chapter, for the public good.”

FAQs

What constitutes as a public record?

What constitutes a public record?

"Public record" means a record that is not private, controlled, or protected and that is not exempt from disclosure as provided in Subsection 63G-2-201(3)(b)

The following are not public records:

"Private record" means a record containing data on individuals that is private as provided by Section 63G-2-302. Some examples of private information include address, age, birth date, birthplace, driver license number, employment history, marital status, signature, sex/gender, social security number, telephone number, etc.

"Protected record" means a record that is classified protected as provided by Section 63G-2-305. Some examples of protected records include drafts, attorney work product, names of donors, minutes of closed-door meetings, records prepared in anticipation of litigation that are not available under the rules of discovery, records relating to an ongoing or planned audit until the audit is released, etc.

"Controlled record" means a record containing data on individuals that is controlled because the record contains medical, psychiatric, or psychological data about an individual, and the City reasonably believes releasing the information could be detrimental to the safety of any individual or would constitute a violation of normal professional practice and medical ethics.

How can I obtain a copy of a City record?

How can I obtain a copy of a City record?

You will need to fill out a Records Request form. You may submit it to the City Recorder’s Office via email, fax (801.229.7197), or in person at 56 North State Street, Suite 200.

How long will it take for the City to provide the record(s) I have requested?

How long will it take for the City to provide the record(s) I have requested?

As soon as reasonably possible, but no later than ten business days after receiving a written request, or five business days after receiving a written request if the requester demonstrates that expedited response to the record request benefits the public rather than the person.

There may be “extraordinary circumstances” that allow the City to delay approval or denial of a request by an additional period of time (see 63G‑2‑204(4)).

How much will it cost?

How much will it cost?

The City may charge a reasonable fee to cover its actual cost of providing a record. Standard sized, black and white pages are $.10 a copy. Color copies are $.50 each.

The City may also charge for the cost of staff time for search, retrieval, and other direct administrative costs for complying with a request (see 63G-2-203).

Does the City have an obligation to create a record in response to a records request?

Does the City have an obligation to create a record in response to a records request?

No. For example, the City is not required to create a record, compile, format, manipulate, package, summarize, or tailor information, provide a record in a particular format, medium, or program not currently maintained by the City, fulfill a person's records request if the request unreasonably duplicates prior records requests from that person. See 63G-2-201(8) for further details.

If my records request is denied, is there an appeal process?

If my records request is denied, is there an appeal process?

Yes (see 63G-2-205). If the City denies the request in whole or part, it will provide a notice of denial to the requester either in person or by sending the notice to the requester's address. The requester may appeal the denial by filing a notice of appeal with the City Manager (at 56 North State Street) within thirty days of the date of the denial letter.

If the City fails to provide the requested record(s) or issue a denial within the specified time period, that failure is considered the equivalent of a determination denying access to the record (see 63G-2-204(7)).

How do I obtain information on past City Council meetings?

How do I obtain information on past City Council meetings?

Approved minutes from past City Council meetings can be found online. Digital City Council minutes are available from 1978 on. Paper copies are available back to 1921. If you need additional information and cannot find it on the website, please call the City Recorder's Office at (801) 229-7298.


Recorder's Office

56 North State Street
Orem, UT 84057
tel: (801) 229-7298 or 229-7074
fax: (801) 229-7197

Please allow 10 business days to process your request.

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Orem City

Orem, UT // 56 North State Street // Phone: 801.229.7000

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About Orem City

The City of Orem was organized in 1919 and named after Walter C. Orem, President of the Salt Lake and Utah Railroad. Orem is now the commercial and technological center for Central Utah and is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the United States. Housing, educational, and employment opportunities continue to be in high demand as Orem's population passes 91,000 residents.

The City of Orem is located on the eastern shore of Utah Lake and extends on the east to Provo and the foothills of Mount Timpanogos. It shares the general location with Provo, and its history is closely related to that of Provo. Its recent explosive development and growth have resulted in Orem becoming the fifth-largest city in Utah according to the 2010 US Census.